You are here

Quality

 

More hospitals are screening patients on health-related social needs as the industry has recognized the importance of factors outside the healthcare system on outcomes. The investments and available funding, however, haven’t been consistent.

It may be obvious to those working in hospitals—and especially in emergency medicine—that a TV medical drama isn’t quite reality. But for patients who are regular viewers of the long-running “Grey’s Anatomy,” the show could have a real-life impact on how satisfied they are with their care.

The establishment of a primary care-led regional health improvement collaboration in the Cleveland area reduced hospitalizations attributed to conditions like heart failure and bacterial pneumonia, saving nearly $40 million, according to a study published in the February 2017 issue of Health Affairs.

In a single year, more than 600,000 patients in Washington state received services that would be considered low value or wasteful, resulting in $282 million in unnecessary healthcare spending.

A five-star rating on CMS’s Nursing Home Compare website may not equate to “five-star service,” according to a Florida Atlantic University (FAU) study that found nursing homes’ scores may be artificially inflated.

 

Recent Headlines

Black patients less likely to be offered or receive knee replacement

The quality of life of black patients with knee osteoarthritis is being impacted by their underutilization of total knee replacement (TKR) surgery, according to a study published in Arthritis Care & Research, with fewer black people being offered the surgery—and when it is offered, they’re less likely than white patients to get the operation.

How hospitals are measuring, addressing social determinants of health

More hospitals are screening patients on health-related social needs as the industry has recognized the importance of factors outside the healthcare system on outcomes. The investments and available funding, however, haven’t been consistent.

How ‘Grey’s Anatomy’ may give patients the wrong ideas about hospital care

It may be obvious to those working in hospitals—and especially in emergency medicine—that a TV medical drama isn’t quite reality. But for patients who are regular viewers of the long-running “Grey’s Anatomy,” the show could have a real-life impact on how satisfied they are with their care.

Hospitalizations reduced by regional collaboration in Ohio

The establishment of a primary care-led regional health improvement collaboration in the Cleveland area reduced hospitalizations attributed to conditions like heart failure and bacterial pneumonia, saving nearly $40 million, according to a study published in the February 2017 issue of Health Affairs.

Wasteful healthcare spending totaled $282M in Washington state

In a single year, more than 600,000 patients in Washington state received services that would be considered low value or wasteful, resulting in $282 million in unnecessary healthcare spending.

How nursing homes may be gaming Medicare star ratings

A five-star rating on CMS’s Nursing Home Compare website may not equate to “five-star service,” according to a Florida Atlantic University (FAU) study that found nursing homes’ scores may be artificially inflated.

Readmissions penalties don't increase mortality rates

A study from the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission (MedPAC) found the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program (HRRP) has largely achieved its goals—and contrary to the findings of an earlier study, it didn’t increase mortality rates.

Joint Commission announces new requirements on obstetrics

Hospitals accredited by the Joint Commission which offer services for labor and delivery will have three new documentation elements of performance (EPs) beginning on July 1.

CMS opens data submission site for 2017 MACRA reporting

Clinicians who participated in the Quality Payment Program (QPP) established by Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA) can now submit their 2017 performance data through an online system—and not to multiple websites as with past CMS programs.

Joint Commission: Individual failure to wash hands will be cited as deficiency

The Joint Commission has adopted a stricter standard on hand hygiene for all its accreditation programs as of Jan. 1, warning healthcare organizations if surveyors observe one worker failing to wash their hands in the process of direct patient care, it will be cited as a deficiency.

Pages