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CMS confirmed Tuesday it will cancel two mandatory bundled payment programs and scale back another—and not all hospitals are happy about it.

A rule title posted to the Federal Register on Aug. 10 indicates CMS will cancel two mandatory bundled payment programs, the Advancing Care Coordination through Episode Payment Models (EPMs) and Cardiac Rehabilitation Incentive (CRI) Payment Models, while changing a separate payment program on joint replacements.

Following up on recommendations by his own White House commission, President Donald Trump said he will declare a national public health emergency on the opioid addiction epidemic, which would have an impact on healthcare providers.

In an analysis of what Affordable Care Act (ACA) exchange insurers are requesting to charge customers in 21 major cities in 2018, the Kaiser Family Foundation found the cost for the second-lowest silver-level plan will range from $244 to $631 per month, with most enrollees cushioned from the price hikes by federal subsidies.

The U.S. Senate unanimously passed a bill on Aug. 3 which would allow terminally ill patients the “right to try” experimental treatments that haven’t yet been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), but critics say it gives patients false hope without allowing for federal oversight.

 

Recent Headlines

CMS actuary: AHCA could cause individual market to collapse

A report from CMS Chief Actuary Paul Spitalnic estimated 13 million fewer people will have insurance coverage under the House-passed version of the American Health Care Act (AHCA), a markedly lower figure than the 23 million predicted by the Congressional Budget Office (CBO).

4 things to know about major medical groups’ anti-AHCA events

Eight groups representing patients, hospitals and physicians will step up efforts opposing the Republican-sponsored American Health Care Act (AHCA) by holding events in four steps to “address shortcomings” in the Affordable Care Act (ACA) replacement plan.

AMA 2017: ACA repeal dominates leaders’ speeches

In their two speeches opening the American Medical Association’s 2017 meeting in Chicago, CEO James Madara, MD, and President Andrew Gurman, MD, both focused on the efforts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA) with a bill the AMA has actively opposed.

Targeted food subsidies could delay, prevent 150,500 CVD deaths in US

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) has declined in the U.S., but its affects are more significant on populations with lower socioeconomic status. A recent study in PLOS Medicine found that a 10 percent subsidy of fruits and vegetables could prevent or postpone 150,500 CVD deaths by 2030.

AMA 2017: Medicaid changes in AHCA could limit healthcare delivery innovation

The American Medical Association (AMA) doesn’t think highly of how the Senate may change Medicaid funding and coverage through repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act (ACA), judging by a presentation from the AMA’s annual meeting in Chicago.

What AMA delegates will vote on at 2017 meeting

The 2017 annual meeting of the American Medical Association’s House of Delegates will take place June 10-14 in Chicago, with educational sessions beginning on June 9. Like every year, delegates have a full slate of proposed resolutions—some more political than related to practice—to consider.

Q&A: Duke's Daniel on the challenges of moving pharma, device companies toward value-based payment

Finding a practical path for pharmaceutical and medical device manufacturers to enter value-based payment arrangements is the goal of a new policy consortium formed at the Robert J. Margolis, MD, Center for Health Policy at Duke University.

Leaked regulation from HHS would roll back ACA’s contraceptive mandate

A draft rule from HHS would allow all employers to seek an exemption from the Affordable Care Act (ACA)’s mandate to cover contraceptives in their insurance plans, leading to many patients having to pay out-of-pocket for birth control, which is currently available at no cost. 

CMS to begin replacing Medicare cards in 2018

New Medicare cards without Social Security numbers will be sent out starting in April 2018, according to CMS, meeting a deadline set by Congress to replace all cards by April 2019.

CBO report bolsters industry opposition to AHCA, worries some Republicans

Organizations representing hospitals and specialties reacted negatively to an estimate the Affordable Care Act (ACA) replacement passed by House Republicans would result in 23 million fewer people having insurance by 2026.

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