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The Senate will not vote on the Republican plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act before the July 4 recess. Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Kentucky, informed his Republican colleagues at a June 27 lunch, according to multiple news outlets.

Some 22 million more people would be uninsured by 2026, deductibles and out-of-pocket costs would sharply rise while premiums would be lower and certain markets could be unstable if the Senate’s version of an Affordable Care Act repeal-and-replace plan becomes law, according to the Congressional Budget Office.

Reaction to the Senate’s version of an Affordable Care Act repeal-and-replace plan, titled the Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA) ranged from strong opposition from physician and hospital groups to outrage from Democrats, while one insurance organization saw some positives in the legislation.

Groups representing physicians, hospitals, internists and health IT were quick to praise the proposed rule for the second year of the new payment tracks under the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA). The American Medical Group Association, however, has a decidedly different take.

The legislation takes many provisions from the House-passed American Health Care Act (AHCA) under a new name: the Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA).

 

Recent Headlines

6.3 million with pre-existing conditions face higher premiums under ACA replacement

If the current version of the American Health Care Act (AHCA) became law, 6.3 million people with pre-existing conditions could be charged more by insurance companies, according to an analysis from the Kaiser Family Foundation.

Gains in insurance coverage stalled in 2016

For the first time since the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was signed into law in 2010, there wasn’t an improvement in the number of people with health insurance last year.

CMS plans to take small business enrollment off HealthCare.gov

Enrollment in the small business version of the Affordable Care Act’s insurance exchanges, known as Federally Facilitated Small Business Health Options Program (FF-SHOP), will be moved off HealthCare.gov for 2018, CMS has announced.

CBO report on AHCA impact coming later in May

The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) will release an updated report on how the American Health Care Act (AHCA) could affect insurance coverage and federal healthcare spending, with the score expected to be released the week of May 22.

Blue Cross Blue Shield steps in as lone exchange insurer in some Tennessee markets

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Tennessee plans on selling individual market plans next year in the Knoxsville area, which had been in danger of having no participating insurer on the Affordable Care Act exchanges for 2018.

HHS criticized over ‘potentially illegal’ memo

Republicans in Congress were critical of a memo circulated to HHS employees instructing them not to speak to federal lawmakers or their staffs without first clearing it with department leadership, saying it may infringe on the rights of whistleblowers.

Q&A: Healthcare lobbyist predicts AHCA will die due to House-Senate disagreement

Major medical organizations appeared united in opposition to the American Health Care Act (AHCA), yet House Republicans passed the bill without making any changes those groups wanted. Julius Hobson Jr., former director of congressional affairs for the AMA who now works for law firm Polsinelli, told HealthExec there’s an obvious answer: campaign promises.

ACA replacement plan likely to change in Senate

Assuming no Democrats defect this time around, Republicans can only afford two “no” votes among their members, with Vice President Mike Pence breaking a 50-50 tie. 

Healthcare industry ‘deeply disappointed’ by House passage of AHCA

Many major medical associations quickly spoke out against the American Health Care Act (AHCA), calling the Republican-sponsored plan to replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA) “bad policy” that could “destabilize our healthcare system,” after it passed by a narrow margin in the House May 4. 

ACA replacement passes in House despite healthcare industry objections

The Republican majority in the House was successful in passing the American Health Care Act (AHCA), its plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA), by a narrow margin of 217-213 over objections about how it could affect people with pre-existing conditions and resistance from major healthcare associations.

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