You are here

Policy

 

The Senate will not vote on the Republican plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act before the July 4 recess. Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Kentucky, informed his Republican colleagues at a June 27 lunch, according to multiple news outlets.

Some 22 million more people would be uninsured by 2026, deductibles and out-of-pocket costs would sharply rise while premiums would be lower and certain markets could be unstable if the Senate’s version of an Affordable Care Act repeal-and-replace plan becomes law, according to the Congressional Budget Office.

Reaction to the Senate’s version of an Affordable Care Act repeal-and-replace plan, titled the Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA) ranged from strong opposition from physician and hospital groups to outrage from Democrats, while one insurance organization saw some positives in the legislation.

Groups representing physicians, hospitals, internists and health IT were quick to praise the proposed rule for the second year of the new payment tracks under the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA). The American Medical Group Association, however, has a decidedly different take.

The legislation takes many provisions from the House-passed American Health Care Act (AHCA) under a new name: the Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA).

 

Recent Headlines

Leaked regulation from HHS would roll back ACA’s contraceptive mandate

A draft rule from HHS would allow all employers to seek an exemption from the Affordable Care Act (ACA)’s mandate to cover contraceptives in their insurance plans, leading to many patients having to pay out-of-pocket for birth control, which is currently available at no cost. 

CMS to begin replacing Medicare cards in 2018

New Medicare cards without Social Security numbers will be sent out starting in April 2018, according to CMS, meeting a deadline set by Congress to replace all cards by April 2019.

CBO report bolsters industry opposition to AHCA, worries some Republicans

Organizations representing hospitals and specialties reacted negatively to an estimate the Affordable Care Act (ACA) replacement passed by House Republicans would result in 23 million fewer people having insurance by 2026.

CBO: AHCA would destabilize individual market in parts of U.S.

The Congressional Budget Office has released its updated report on the American Health Care Act (AHCA), saying the Affordable Care Act (ACA) replacement passed by House Republicans would still erase the recent gains in insurance coverage and potentially price less healthy enrollees out of the individual market.

Conservative groups to Senate Republicans: No auto-enrollment in ACA repeal

Conservative advocacy groups laid out their priorities for healthcare policy as the Senate crafts its own version of an Affordable Care Act (ACA) replacement, warning against a proposed “auto-enrollment” option to replace the ACA’s penalty for not buying insurance.  

Trump’s HHS budget cuts 16 percent across agency, including NIH, ONC

The full fiscal year 2018 budget proposal for HHS would include deep cuts to Medicaid, while making immediate cuts to National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT (ONC) and almost all HHS agencies. 

$400 billion California single-payer system offers providers 'little incentive' to control costs

The proposed single-payer healthcare system being debated in California would come with a $400 billion annual price tag—more than double the state’s annual budget—according to a review released by the California Senate Appropriations Committee.

90-day delay in ACA subsidy lawsuit adds to uncertainty for insurers

The Trump administration has asked for a 90-day delay on a ruling which could end Affordable Care Act (ACA) subsidies to insurers, pushing back a potentially market-destabilizing move but offering little assurance to actuaries working on 2018 rate requests for the ACA exchanges.

Why the House may have to vote on the AHCA again

Two weeks after the U.S. House of Representatives narrowly passed an Affordable Care Act (ACA) replacement plan, the bill hasn’t been sent to the Senate because potential procedural problems may force the House to amend the legislation and then vote on it again.

CMS could boost ACA enrollment by letting consumers skip Healthcare.gov

Customers on the Affordable Care Act exchanges will be allowed to enroll directly on sites run by third-party brokers and insurers, rather than be redirected to Healthcare.gov, raising concerns from some group about privacy and choice for those shoppers.

Pages