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Nicholas Leider
Managing Editor
Nicholas joined TriMed in 2016 as the managing editor of the Chicago office. After receiving his master’s from Roosevelt University, he worked in various writing/editing roles for magazines ranging in topic from billiards to metallurgy. Currently on Chicago’s north side, Nicholas keeps busy by running, reading and talking to his two cats.
 - Melissa Cappuccilli
Cardiovascular Business

The American College of Cardiology has recognized Melissa Cappuccilli, a nurse and single mother of four who received a heart transplant in 2013, as a part of its “I am CardioSmart” contest.

 - Left main PCI
Cardiovascular Business

Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is preferred to percutaneous coronary intervention for patients with diabetes and coronary artery disease (CAD). But new research showed CABG outperformed PCI when focusing specifically on individuals with left ventricular dysfunction (LVD), a population that had been excluded in past studies.

Cardiovascular Business

Researchers from the University of Southern California (USC) have archived and shared an open-source data set of brain MRI from stroke patients known as the Anatomical Tracings of Lesion After Stroke (ATLAS).

Health Imaging

Researchers from the University of Southern California (USC) have archived and shared the Anatomical Tracings of Lesion After Stroke (ATLAS), an open-source data set of brain MRI from stroke patients, published online Feb. 20 in Scientific Data.

Cardiovascular Business

A group of prominent European medical societies published clinical recommendations for those with pre-existing cardiovascular conditions at high altitude. The document was published Jan. 11 in the European Heart Journal.

Health Imaging

Virginia Harrod fought her way through stage 3 breast cancer. She survived the double mastectomy that followed her diagnoses. Harrod then underwent radiation therapy. In the end, lymphedema—the swelling of soft tissue in extremities—proved to be the biggest challenge.

Purdue Pharma, the producer of OxyContin, recently announced it would end physician-directed marketing of all opioids. The move is a step forward in efforts to control misuse and abuse of opioids in the U.S., but, according to physicians in Maine, it comes two decades too late.

Health Imaging

Liz O’Riordan, as consultant oncoplastic breast surgeon in the U.K., has spent her entire career removing cancer from others. But after being diagnosed with stage 3 breast cancer in July 2015, she found herself on the other side of the equation.

Health Exec

The University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) received a $500 million commitment from the Helen Diller Foundation to help plan and build a new hospital, according to a Feb. 8 release from the university.

 - Durbin on Opioid Addiction
Health Exec

Purdue Pharma, best known for making and selling OxyContin, announced Feb. 10 that it will stop marketing opioid drugs to physicians. The company also stated it will lay off half of its sales force, with the remaining staff of 200 focusing on other medications.